Tag Archives: recovery

Three Things

Posted on April 11, 2016

Part 3: Prepare and Plan for Urges

By Jim (GJBXVI) Braastad

 

StrategyScientific research shows that people who have recovered successfully (regardless of the method used) all have three things in common, those being: 

  • Commitment to sobriety; 
  • Change in lifestyle; and 
  • Prepare and plan for urges.

In prior posts, I’ve provided why I strongly believe a commitment to sobriety is so crucial in the path to recovery, and how a change in lifestyle will be needed to be made as well. In this final post in the series, we’ll talk about the last of the “Three Things”, to prepare and plan for urges. Continue reading

Three Things

Posted on March 29, 2016

Part 1: Commitment to Sobriety

By Jim (GJBXVI) Braastad

Green Carabine with White Ropes on Sky Background, Symbolizing the CommitmentWhile meandering around the SMART Recovery community website (SROL), I came across the following tidbit of information:

Scientific research shows that people who have recovered successfully (regardless of the method used) all have three things in common, those being: 

  • A commitment to sobriety; 
  • A change in lifestyle; and 
  • They prepare and plan for urges.

I believe the need for each these three things to be true. While each of them is important in the big picture, I think the “commitment to sobriety” is listed first for a reason. Continue reading

Which SMART resources do people find helpful? Results from 2015 survey

Posted on March 2, 2016

check list color doodle, speech bubbleEach year, SMART Recovery issues an annual survey to gain feedback from SMART participants. Respondents range from people who are actively in recovery and using SMART’s resources to family and friends, SMART volunteers, and treatment professionals. This year, 1,325 people responded – making it the largest response since the survey was launched in 2008.

Continue reading

How To Avoid Conversation Traps

Posted on January 27, 2016

– reposted from the Center for Motivation and Change blog

 

holidaysIf you are someone who would like to help a loved one change their relationship with substances or to make any behavioral change, there are four essential tools you can learn. First, Helping through Understanding or thinking about issues of addiction differently using the science we now have available. Second, Helping by Taking Care of Yourself as you need to be able to survive and thrive while trying to help. Third, Helping through Words or learning positive communication strategies that shift the conversation from negative to positive. And Fourth, Helping with Actions which are usually using positive reinforcement strategies.

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Having Trouble “Staying Stopped”?

Posted on January 18, 2016

Refuting Your Excuses
by Michael Edelstein, Ph.D.

“It’s easy to quit smoking. I’ve done it hundreds of times.” ~Mark Twain

Excuses Stopping? Easy. “Staying stopped?” Not so much.

Have you ever had thoughts like these?:

“I can start tomorrow”, “I really need a drink”, “I’m too tired”, “I’ll just have one”, “This is how I have fun with my friends, it’s not hurting anybody,” “It’s too hard to quit.”

“Excuses” are statements we sometimes make to ourselves that make our addictive behavior seem reasonable.

In other words, we use excuses to justify behavior that we know is harmful. These excuses are destructive. They block, interfere, or sabotage our goals of addiction recovery and more. We may be so practiced in thinking these excuses that they have become automatic. We may not even be aware that we’re making these excuses unless we pay close attention to our thoughts.

“Refutations” are statements that disprove or weaken an “excuse.”

“Refuting Your Excuses” is an exercise for learning to pay attention to our habitual excuses and to evaluate them logically. Is the excuse true? Does it make good sense? Is it helpful?

How to Refute an Excuse:

1. For a recurring or current excuse you use, Continue reading

SMART Recovery® on Prince Edward Island (PEI)

Posted on January 4, 2016

by Rose Barbour, SMART Recovery Facilitator from Prince Edward Island(PEI), Canada

A grunge textured digital illustration of a group of diverse hands reaching together in unity and support.While searching for different programs for my son, who didn’t connect with the 12-steps programs, I stumbled upon SMART Recovery. There were no meetings offered in my area so I signed up for the training with the plan to start one. I was excited about it because I knew that my son wasn’t the only one without a program he could relate to. SMART Recovery would give them a choice. Continue reading