Tag Archives: goals

Identify & Overcome Your Procrastination Habits

Posted on June 14, 2011

Anti-Procrastination Workshop Series
Led by Dr. Bill Knaus, Ed.D.
Friday , July 1st at 7 PM EDT.
Download Informational Flyer
podcast Intro Meeting, Part I
podcast Intro Meeting, Part II
podcast Wrap Up Meeting. Part I
podcast Wrap Up Meeting, Part II

Dr. Bill Knaus, Ed.D., psychologist and renowned authority in the field of overcoming procrastination, will join SMART Recovery® Online to present an Anti-Procrastination Workshop Series during the month of July. The workshop is an adaptation of his highly successful face-to-face workshops and will last for five weeks. The format of the workshops will follow a concept/application presentation, beginning with a Main Event, followed by three Q&A Sessions, and a final Booster Session to provide an overview and ways forward to end procrastination.

Dr. Knaus is a premier expert in the field of helping people overcome procrastination. He originated the self-help movement for overcoming procrastination and has worked with thousands of people in his individual private practice and in his transformational anti-procrastination workshops. Over 1 million people have benefited from reading his bestselling books on procrastination. Continue reading

Working Toward Goals for Recovery

Posted on February 11, 2011

SMART Goals Goals are important for everyone. Thinking on and reviewing goals are important both before and after you quit using an addictive substance.

What are goals? You can think of goals as being what you want. Generally your goals are happiness and survival. More specifically, you may want a better job or a happier marriage. When you use addicting substances, you seek relief from stress and misery, a high, or fun with friends. When thinking of quitting, you think of getting rid of some of the problems you’ve developed and living a better life.

What about later, when you are well on your way to recovery? You’ll do well to have some goals that are long-term interests. Many people try improving their relationships with others, finding a better job (as mentioned above), or finding a hobby in which they can absorb themselves.

Often this isn’t easy. Addiction creates such a focus on short-term pleasures and solutions to problems that you may not readily find yourself succeeding at enjoying yourself when you quit. Here are some questions you may ask yourself to see how well you are achieving your goals. Occasionally ask them to yourself, be honest with how you answer them, and see what you find.

Continue reading