Tag Archives: cognitive behavior therapy

3 Ways to Dispute Irrational Beliefs

Posted on November 4, 2014

Are You a Loser?

QuestionPeople observe their behavior, and evaluate it in terms of how well they like it. If we did not do this, we would have no way of improving how we act.  When people seek help in therapy, in self-help groups, or by reading self-help books, they are not merely observing and thinking of their behaviors and deciding how to make adjustments. Typically, their thinking interferes with their ability to adjust and often they’re mainly aware of their misery.

REBT attempts to show you that (1) events do not automatically create your thoughts, (2) events do not cause your emotions, and (3) by changing your thinking, you will see things differently, and then your thoughts and emotions will aid you instead of interfering with your actions.

Let’s say you failed at something important to you. Compare the following two sets of thoughts regarding how they make you feel, how truthful they are, and how well they help you adjust.

1. I failed and that’s bad. Maybe I didn’t pay close enough attention to what was going on to prevent my failure. I regret that.

2. I should not have failed. It’s awful to fail as I did. Because I did fail, I’m a loser; I can’t stand myself.

Continue reading

Check Yourself Before You Wreck Yourself!

Posted on June 3, 2014

by Margaret Speer, SMART Recovery meeting participant

I believe in self-empowerment and the power of choice. I successfully used these techniques to remain mindful and sober. I’ve improved my confidence, self-acceptance, and increased my independent positive decisions. I lived my life too long and blind to the power I hold within myself. Sobriety through self-empowerment was the hardest journey I have ever accomplished. I developed a healthier lifestyle within my daily routine and recovery goals. I know it is going to take my lifetime to maintain my recovery in addiction to alcohol while developing patience for my impulsive behaviors.

Since I was 15 years old, I have experienced complications with my involvement with alcohol. I was consistently battling, and failing with every attempt to stop my chemical use. Finally when I was 30 years old I woke up and removed my blinders – eyes wide open. Continue reading

Scientifically Supported Recovery

Posted on July 16, 2013

Clinical Trial of SMART Recovery’s Effectiveness


ResearchersThere have been many success stories during the 19-year history of SMART Recovery. The most recent of these is scientific evidence that supports SMART’s effectiveness in dealing with alcohol problems.

Like AA, SMART Recovery provides free mutual help for anyone desiring to abstain from alcohol. However, SMART Recovery’s approach, based on cognitive-behavior therapy tools, is quite different from that of AA. Many have questioned whether this type of addiction recovery alternative is helpful.

To answer this question, a randomized clinical trial, funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) recruited 189 heavy drinkers who were new to SMART Recovery. A web app, Overcoming Addictions (OA), based on the SMART Recovery 4-Point Program®, was created and the 189 heavy drinkers who were new to SMART were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: 1) use the OA web app alone; 2) use the OA web app, plus attend SMART Recovery meetings, or 3) attend SMART Recovery meetings only. “Significant others” were interviewed to verify the participant’s self-report at baseline and at follow-up.

Researchers assessed the percentage of days abstinent and the amount of negative alcohol/drug consequences in the three months prior to enrollment in the study and at follow-up. After three months, participants in all groups increased their percentage of days abstinent from 44% to 72%, and significantly reduced their negative alcohol/drug consequences. There were no significant differences between groups. Based on the results obtained with other recovery approaches, these results are clinically significant. Individuals who find the SMART Recovery approach appealing can try it with confidence.

    “I am feeling all kinds of freedom that I had not experienced in the past. I feel like I am growing and stretching and learning. There has been a lot of internal progress, and I am so grateful for my time at SMART Recovery. SMART Recovery Online really is a home base for me — my touchstone. Community meetings have been beneficial to me, as well. I had some good long lapses in the past, but I have always stayed in touch online. And I’ve had some darn good successes, too — I’m now almost 4 years sober and continuing to grow.” Dee, SMART Volunteer

The report of the clinical trial has just been published online at the open access Journal of Medical Internet Research.

The Overcoming Addictions web app will be available to the public in the fall of 2013, via the SMART Recovery website.

About the study: The study was conducted by the Research Division of Behavior Therapy Associates, LLC.

Combatting Depression

Posted on May 22, 2012

A Workshop with Bill Knaus, Ed.D.
Friday, June 15, 2012, 6pm edst
podcast

depression

SMART Recovery® is delighted to announce that on Friday, June 15, 2012 at 6:00 pm, highly renowned psychotherapist and author, Dr. Bill Knaus, Ed.D. will present an exciting new workshop entitled Combatting Depression.

Cognitive behavioral therapy is the most widely used psychological method for combatting depression, for one simple reason: it works. In this brief workshop, Dr. Bill Knaus will introduce you to cognitive, emotive, and behavioral techniques to overcome and prevent depression. He will share innovative, practical and evidence-based ideas from the second edition of his newly published The Cognitive Behavioral Workbook for Depression (New Harbinger, June 2012). This book is already receiving great acclaim, and may be the best of its kind. It has been endorsed by a former APA president, founders of psychotherapy clinics, professors emeritus, and psychotherapists who work with people suffering from depression. Often, depression and substance abuse go hand-in-hand. If you, a friend, or relative battles depression, don’t miss this presentation! Continue reading

Is Your Gambling A Problem?

Posted on February 28, 2012

Self-Help for Independence from Problem Gambling and Gambling Addiction
By Rich Dowling, MA, LPC, MAC


Problem Gambling Are you finding yourself asking, “Why do I gamble so much? And how can I stop?” You are not alone.

Compulsive gambling and pathological gambling are growing problems in the United States. Casinos, lotteries, and the availability of bookies are easier, faster, and more widespread. Internet gambling impact reaches far and wide. The good news is that Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) based Professional Treatment and Self-Help models such as SMART Recovery
(Self-Management and Recovery Training) can be very helpful for gaining independence from addictions, including problem gambling.


Change your thinking, change your gambling problem

SMART Recovery is an abstinence based, self-reliance model for addiction recovery. It is founded on the idea that people generally feel and behave the way they think, with thinking being the one thing over which humans have the most control. Therefore, with determination and persistence, people can change the way they feel and behave by changing their thinking. The mission of SMART Recovery is to assist individuals with their desire to gain independence from addictions in general through a change in their thinking about activities such as problem gambling, Continue reading

SMART Way To Fight Addiction

Posted on March 28, 2011

We’ve received some excellent press coverage in Durham, North Carolina thanks to John Boren, who runs the SMART Recovery® group there. Congratulations and thanks to John! Here’s a snippet from the article:

John Boren started the SMART (Self-Management And Recovery Training) Recovery group in Durham. It’s part of a national organization that has about 650 groups across the United States, and some in Britain and Australia.

The self-help program has attracted some people who were dissatisfied with Alcoholics Anonymous, as well as those who are just starting to grapple with addiction and recovery.

The biggest difference in the two organizations, Boren said, is in their philosophy of what works. AA is based on a 12-step recovery program, but SMART Recovery is rooted in “cognitive behavior therapy,” he said. That means that “much of what you do is determined by what you think,” he said. “How you think about a situation determines significantly what you do in that situation.”

To read the whole article, visit the article at The Herald-Sun.