Three Things

Posted on March 29, 2016

Part 1: Commitment to Sobriety

By Jim (GJBXVI) Braastad

Green Carabine with White Ropes on Sky Background, Symbolizing the CommitmentWhile meandering around the SMART Recovery community website (SROL), I came across the following tidbit of information:

Scientific research shows that people who have recovered successfully (regardless of the method used) all have three things in common, those being: 

  • A commitment to sobriety; 
  • A change in lifestyle; and 
  • They prepare and plan for urges.

I believe the need for each these three things to be true. While each of them is important in the big picture, I think the “commitment to sobriety” is listed first for a reason. Continue reading

What is SMART Recovery?

Posted on March 21, 2016

A visual overview

What is SMART Recovery? We’re so glad you asked!

Check out this terrific visual overview created just for us by RehabCenter.net


RehabCenter.net provides an online comprehensive guide to rehab centers and addiction treatment options. We’re grateful to them for preparing this infographic which so clearly answers the question “What is SMART Recovery!” Continue reading

From Sex Addiction to a Meaningful Life

Posted on March 15, 2016

What Motivates a Person to Change?

It’s hard for any of us to walk away from pleasure. Hell, it’s hard for most of us to take a pass on the dessert tray.

Portrait of a young male labelled as YOU.

Consider the plight of the person who’s considering making a commitment to sex addiction recovery. The pleasure they experience is not from sex, per se, it’s from the rush of neurotransmitters that get released into the brain from the anticipation and the ritual involved in sexual acting out. In a state I have labeled “the erotic haze”, their reward receptors get flooded with the neurochemical dopamine and they feel great. They’re not really addicted to sex; they’re addicted to their own neurotransmitters.

Continue reading

Family, Friends, and Addiction Recovery

Posted on March 8, 2016

Get Your Loved One Sober: Alternatives to Nagging, Pleading, and Threatening
Reviewed by Henry Steinberger, Ph.D.

Get Your Loved One SoberTo help people seeking sobriety for their loved ones, Get Your Loved One Sober offers a revolutionary program: The Community Reinforcement And Family Training (CRAFT) intervention. The subtitle, “Alternatives to Nagging, Pleading, and Threatening” more aptly describes what this book is about. Getting a loved one into treatment is not the first goal. Arranging for one’s own safety and finding a happier life independent of the drinker’s situation, takes priority. Getting a loved one to moderate, choose sobriety, or go into treatment, are offered as roads to a better relationship.

Still, CRAFT can boast phenomenal success getting people into treatment. An alternative to Al-Anon’s 12-Step tradition and “detachment” recommendations and the Johnson Institute’s confrontational interventions, the CRAFT program is based on non-confrontational behavioral principles like reinforcement. It gives the reader tools and instructions for changing their interactions with their loved ones, which in turn changes the loved one’s behavior. In repeated clinical trials, CRAFT proved twice as likely as the Johnson Intervention and six times as likely as Al-Anon to get loved ones into treatment.

Continue reading

Which SMART resources do people find helpful? Results from 2015 survey

Posted on March 2, 2016

check list color doodle, speech bubbleEach year, SMART Recovery issues an annual survey to gain feedback from SMART participants. Respondents range from people who are actively in recovery and using SMART’s resources to family and friends, SMART volunteers, and treatment professionals. This year, 1,325 people responded – making it the largest response since the survey was launched in 2008.

Continue reading

Grief & Loss in Recovery

Posted on February 23, 2016

At some point in life we will all experience the loss of someone we dearly love and care about. It can be through sudden death, illness, or even a breakdown of a relationship. Overwhelming feelings follow, and the unprecedented feeling of loss can sometimes trigger a return to past, addictive behavior.

For me, understanding the grieving process and the stages a person has to go through helped me understand and finally accept the unacceptable and significantly reduced my risk of relapse.

Continue reading