Monthly Archives: September 2012

The Flip Side of Fallibility

Posted on September 25, 2012

The Importance of Self Acceptance in Addiction Recovery
Dr. Philip Tate, author of Alcohol: How to Give It Up and Be Glad You Did


FallibleAn important aspect of accepting yourself is to accept that you are fallible. An outcome of your fallible nature is that you may want something, you may try to get it, and you may come up short. More specifically, you want happiness and you try to gain it by drinking. In the long run, you gain some things you didn’t intend, such as depression, getting arrested, having your marriage(s) break up, or some other unwanted consequence. Another example is that you may believe you have the knowledge and the power to quit. Then you try, and you fail.

Part of our fallible nature is emotional. As an example, you may feel very good about drinking when thinking this is wonderful, self-enhancing, and a great way to escape your problems. On the negative side, you may be unable to feel pleasure when you think of a positive event such as a gain from quitting. This may include keeping your marriage or job or living longer. You may think of these and gain little pleasure at the thought. Depression can be one cause of this.

Another part of our fallible nature is our crooked thinking. Continue reading

Drugs in the Americas

Posted on September 11, 2012

Gil Kerlikowske, Director of National Drug Control Policy discusses drug policy with Stephen Johnson, Director, Americas Program, at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

R. Gil Kerlikowske was nominated by President Obama and confirmed by the U.S. Senate as the Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy in 2009. In his position, Mr. Kerlikowske coordinates all aspects of Federal drug control programs and implementation of the President’s National Drug Control Strategy. Continue reading

Let’s Do Something Stupid!

Posted on September 4, 2012

Challenges of Addiction Recovery
by: Hank Robb, PhD, ABPP

Challenges of Addiction Recovery Everybody has a voice inside his or her head that sometimes says, “How about doing something stupid?” The “stupid thing” varies from time to time, person to person, and place to place, but that voice is always “just around the corner.” You’re not “powerless” you’re just a living human being with the problem faced by all living human beings: that voice that says, “How about doing something stupid?”

“Getting SMART” means learning to recognize that voice and then refusing to go along with it. Because the bad results from the following the “stupid voice” don’t show up right away, staying “SMART” means keeping your eyes on the prize and moving toward what’s really important to you.

You never loose control of your hands, arms, feet, and mouth (unless you have a stroke or a seizure) — that ‘blah, blah, blah’ inside your head can’t make you do anything. You’re in control of you, even if you are not in control of that ‘blah, blah, blah’. You can always refuse to go along with that sometimes oh, so tempting, stupid voice inside your noggin.

When you do refuse, you may have some unpleasant feelings for awhile. Just remember:

Though unpleasant feelings come and go
You’re always around to run the show!



Hank Robb, Ph.D., is a Supervisor for the Institute for Rational-Emotive Therapy (New York), board certified in both Counseling Psychology as well as Behavioral Psychology and holds a Certificate of Proficiency in the Treatment of Alcohol and Other Psychoactive Substance Use Disorders from the American Psychological Association’s College of Professional Psychology. He previously served as President of the American Board of Counseling Psychology and is listed as an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Trainer.

Dr. Robb is a founding member of SMART Recovery and continues to write regularly for the SMART New & Views newsletter on topics related to cognitive behavioral (CBT) and Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) — thoughts of great interest to those in the forefront of psychological thought as well as to the individual who wants to create the life he/she wants to live. He is also an active SMART facilitator and advisor. Continue reading