Monthly Archives: April 2012

Got Drugs? National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day

Posted on April 24, 2012

Help Prevent Prescription Drug Abuse, Saturday, April 28, 2012

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has scheduled another National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day, to be held on Saturday, April 28, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Data Shows that Friends and Family Are A Primary Source of Abused Painkillers

From the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP):

The ONDCP has released a new data analysis revealing that the majority of first-time or occasional prescription drug abusers are most likely to get their drugs from a friend or family member– for free, or without permission. Prescription drugs are the second-most abused category of drugs in the United States, following marijuana. When taken as directed for legitimate medical purposes, prescription drugs are safe and effective. However, they are just as dangerous and deadly as illegal drugs when used for non-medical reasons. This new analysis found that:

Among new abusers of pain relievers (those who began misuse of pain relievers in the past year), 68 percent obtained the pills from a friend or relative for free or took them without asking, Continue reading

Are You Addicted To A State Of Mind?

Posted on April 17, 2012

How to replace unhealthy addiction activities with healthy and rational choices

We experience different states of consciousness every day. At work, we must stay “on,” stay focused, respond carefully, etc. At home, we like to “zone out,” to not be “on,” to relax. We also all enjoy a different state of consciousness: sleep.

But at other times, many of us also like something very different from either our “on,” focused, responsible state or our relaxed, “zoned out” state. Some chemicals and activities help us achieve these different states, e.g., alcohol, skiing, sex, internet gaming, dancing, etc. For many people, these result in wonderful states of consciousness, and they manage not to overdo them or get addicted to them. But supposing you are not so lucky and become dependent or addicted.

The dopamine rush
Modern neuroscience suggests that we all need a certain level of dopamine to feel okay. Continue reading

5 Ways to Deal With Urges and Cravings

Posted on April 10, 2012

By Randy Lindel, Facilitator, SMART Recovery® Boston

Read on for five (5) practical ideas on how to cope with urges and cravings after you have decided to abstain from drugs and alcohol.

Cravings are normal

Everyone who’s engaged in addictive behavior will experience uncomfortable cravings (“I want it badly”) and urges (“I have to do it now”). They are normal. And fortunately, they always pass with time. At the outset of recovery, they can be pretty intense, but each one will subside if you can wait it out and have a plan for relapse prevention. Cravings and urges will decrease in strength and frequency over time. You can make this happen by adopting some coping strategies that work best for you.

Learning to resist cravings

For many people, urges and cravings to use drugs or alcohol trigger automatic responses. They are without conscious thought: I want [fill in the blank]. = I get it. Learning to say NO to these intense, ingrained desires is one of the biggest challenges in recovery. The good news is that you can understand these desires and learn to resist them. Continue reading

You’ve Been Lied To

Posted on April 3, 2012

The UNTOLD Truth About Mainstream Alcohol and Addiction Treatment Programs and the SECRETS on How to Eliminate the Problem for Good
by Hank Hayes

Ashley E. Phillips, SMART Recovery Volunteer

Personal accounts of struggles with addiction abound–Hank Hayes’ book is a bit different because it emphasizes a new, solution oriented approach, rather than focusing on the problem of alcohol abuse.

Hayes lets the reader know from the start that his experience with 12-step recovery was ultimately not successful, although I must say he seems to have given it his very best effort. The 12-step approach to overcoming addiction is the one most mainstream Americans are familiar with, and an approach that works for many, but not for all.

In clear, plain language, Hayes critiques the 12-step method from his perspective. Many people will relate to his story and his frustrations.
Happily, he found an alternative recovery approach that did work for him and he not only shares it (SMART Recovery, a program based on Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy–REBT) but he also presents his own set of guidelines for achieving addiction-free health and lifestyle balance during recovery and in post addiction life. Continue reading